Archive for July, 2010

It’s easy to locate the trucks and equipment you need, when you need them, at Waste Equipment Exchange….just use the Classified Listing pages.

The Classified Listings at www.weex.ca are just like any classified ad, but at weex.ca you can see up to 9 pictures of the vehicle, from all sides.  And unlike publication ads, there are full descriptions, a location map, and a Question/Answer feature that allows you to ask the seller questions about their equipment and the answers appear right in the ad – try that with a newspaper or publication.

Waste Equipment Exchange is dedicated to the industry we work in.  Our truck and equipment ads are not mixed up with 1,000’s of other ads for boats, pets, clothes or used baby furniture – not that there is anything wrong with that stuff.

Buying vehicles and equipment through our Classified Ads, is as simple as clicking the categories drop down menu, picking the appropriate category (Front Load Trucks for example) , finding the truck or equipment you are looking for and contacting the seller.  There are no commission fees when buying or selling in the classified ad section of the site.  As a purchaser you are free to browse the listings and contact the sellers directly, either to discuss additional information, pricing or to arrange an inspection.

As a buyer you must be registered, but registration is free quick and easy (register now).  Then you can list your truck or equipment 24 hours a day for as little as $39.99/mth for each item – less than a coffee a day.

While doing business on-line is getting easier, and more secure all the time, you should always use the same precautions that you would in any transaction.  Take the time to get as much information from the seller as possible, through emails and especially by phone.  Get additional information including the VIN#, you can run this through the local dealer and get a full spec on the truck.  Ask the seller specifically about the pictures, are they recent, is this the actual truck for sale, etc.  Once you have the info and the truck seems like it the one you want, take the trip to inspect it.  It may cost a day, but if you’re going to spend $1,000’s of dollars on a truck or equipment a couple hundred bucks is cheap insurance.

Most users on our site are generally honest, hardworking guys, like you and me; but it only takes one bad guy to mess up a good thing.  If you see a listing that seems suspicious or does not comply with our rules contact us immediately.  If you have dealt with someone that has tried to scam you, don’t let them move on to someone else.  Contact your local police, Canadian PhoneBusters  1-888-495-8501 or go to www.phonebusters.com, or The RCMP at www.rcmp-grc.gc.ca/scams-fraudes .

Just a hopper full,

from The Trashman

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Getting the right spec’ for the application of your truck is key if………you want your truck to be around long enough to see a good re-sale value.

The right spec is vitally important when buying your vehicle, but it’s also an important criterion when selling it.  A 32yrd front load truck with a 14,000 lb front axle, 40,000lb diff, and standard transmission may be a little cheaper up front, but the re-sale value will feel the effects later on.  That’s not to say you should only buy your truck based on the projected re-sale after 6-8 yrs…….but taking that number into consideration isn’t going to hurt you either.  The re-sale value could be a great down payment on your next truck, whether you sell it yourself or trade it in.

The right spec on a truck is also important with respect to the time it takes to sell it, not unlike a house beside a set of rail road tracks.  Eventually you will find a buyer that loves the sound of a rumbling train in their back yard, it’s just not the typical buyer so it will take some time to find them.

So what’s the right spec’?  If you ask yourself a couple of key questions and understand your business and the weight regulations well, the spec is pretty easy to figure out.

Make, Model, Year. From a resale stand point, purchase a 2012 in the early part of 2011, you get an extra 6-9 months before it becomes a year old.  Also consider the dealer support in your area.  Buying a Mack in the BC interior means the resale will be to someone equally dedicated to Mack or toward the east side of the country where Mack support is greater.  That extra transportation could kill the deal.

Components & Extras. Stick with components that are familiar to you, your maintenance staff and the industry.  This is strictly from a resale point of view.  The more well know and familiar the eng, trans, diff and suspension are, the better the value at time of selling.

Extras? As long as there is value to you at the time of purchase, the extras go a long way at resale.  Heavier axles and suspension, Auto Greaser, Scales, Rear Camera, Extended Warranty etc., will justify a higher asking price.

Body Mfg. Most regions across the country will have local roll off body builders.  However that choice automatically restricts the area you can resell the unit.  While John & Sons make a great hoist for the Toronto market, its name doesn’t have the same value in Vancouver or Halifax.

A national supplier like Universal Handling Equipment (UHE) will retain resale value across the country in all regions.  Even if your market is comfortable with a local builder, a well known, quality product needs no introductions.

So, when you begin to spec out the next new truck, take into consideration the resale value.  Work the numbers through to the end of the payments (5-7yrs), research an approximate value of the same truck you’re purchasing at that age.  Then consider this “What would you pay for a good used truck, that’s clean, well maintained and has the right spec?”  Most buyers don’t mind paying a little more to get what they want.

Just a hopper full,

from the Trashman.

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Purchasing a good deal can save your company some money, but is the complicated process to get it home worth it?  It’s not really that complicated if you follow some easy steps…..

When purchasing in the US, keep the obvious in mind;

*Most US body manufactures do not have dealer support in Canada, making the parts difficult to come by, or very expensive.

*While the common belief is that you’re not required to pay the state tax because you’re purchasing for export, have the conversation with the seller about their particular state tax rules, some insist you pay and claim back the tax.

*Make sure the vehicle is admissible into Canada – go to RIV Website to view the list of admissible vehicles.

OK, you found a truck, you’ve paid for it and it’s in the US.  Now what?  A transportation company will bring the unit back, but it can be expensive and take a few weeks.  The quickest and least expensive way is to go down and pick it up.

Here are the basic steps to getting your new truck into Canada and on the road:

1./ US customs must have a certified copy of title (faxed copy will work, the original must be with you when you cross) at the border location you are planning to cross 72hrs before you get there, weekends not included.  Make sure there are no lien’s registered on the vehicle, this will stop the process immediately.  Here is a link to the list of US border crossings with contact information to check the hours of operation; many are not open 24 hrs.

2./ When you arrive at US customs, ensure you have the bill of sale, and the title signed in ALL the right places with ALL information completed.  If there are 2 names listed on the title, ensure the same 2 names are on the bill of sale.  Customs will verify the information and possibly inspect/search the truck.  Have the truck power washed before getting to the border and clean any and all debris from the cab and the body.  You can be denied entry if customs has a concern about the mud (soil) and any garbage in or on the truck.

3./ Once you have cleared US customs, you must stop at Canada customs as well (don’t skip this step).  Canada customs will need to see the stamped paperwork from US customs and have you fill out some paperwork (RIV Form1) and collect the HST.  When you leave Canada customs you should have the bill of sale, original title and the RIV Form1.  Keep this safe, you can’t replace this paperwork – trust me!

4./ All vehicles must meet Canadian safety standards.  Most truck manufacturers meet the requirements; however some may not have the speedometer reading in Kilometres or have Day Running Lights.  These are required for your vehicle before it gets cleared for the road.  The vehicle cannot not have any open recalls – this can be checked by a dealership.  You must get a copy of the dealership invoice, work order etc., clearing the vehicle of open recalls.

5./ With the speedometer in kms, day running lights installed and recalls cleared, fax the recall information to RIV to have a Form2 issued.  A Form2 is an inspection document that must be presented at an RIV authorized inspection facility (most Canadian Tire Stores are authorized) to prove the vehicle meets the safety standards.   RIV (Registrar of Imported Vehicles) requires a processing fee before they will issue a Form2.  The fee can be paid on line at www.riv.ca.

6./ Once you have received the Form2 (usually emailed) take the truck and all your paperwork to the inspection facility.  They will verify the VIN, Day Running Lights, Speedometer, and tire pressures and size and axle weights.  Axle weight should be displayed either on the driver side door jam or on a metal plate inside the cab (driver side floor, under the dash, behind the seats) installed by the body manufacturer.  They will stamp the Form1 and probably keep the Form2, but you should ask for a copy.

Take the stamped Form1, Bill of Sale, Original Title plus any other paper work you have gathered during this process to the license office.  The licence office will take what they need and give back the rest along with a provincial title for the vehicle.

While the process seems complicated, it gets easier after the first time and the deals that can sometimes be found in the US, will make the task worthwhile.

Just a hopper full,

from the Trashman

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